Category Archives for Time Management

Sales Leader, Revenue, Activities

TSE 1152: Managing Tasks as a Leader

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Sales Leader, Revenue, ActivitiesManaging tasks as a leader is difficult because all the tasks are urgent and you have the internal battle of deciding which tasks need your attention. 

You might have a meeting with recruiters about the hiring, or you’ve got to do an interview with some sales reps, or you’ve got to create a report for the VP, and other equally important stuff. The list could go on and on and in the end, you aren’t able to get anything done to bring in more revenue. 

The challenge 

As team leaders, the best thing we can give to the sales rep is our care and utmost concern. Unfortunately, though, things don’t go the way we plan due to minute tasks that bog us down. Team leaders are faced with the challenge of managing their time to do the things that will impact the entire team in a good way. 

The grumpy sales manager syndrome 

The grumpy sales manager syndrome is nothing new and you might have experienced an episode of it once or twice. You are the leader so it’s natural to be bombarded with so many things to do: 

  • make reports 
  • attend meetings with sales reps 
  • meet with recruiters
  • meet with marketing folks

You are swamped with many different tasks and it’s overwhelming you.

Mike Weinberg mentioned this in his book Sales Management Simplified where he discussed all the different sales management myths and challenges. He then explained it in a way that’s both understandable and relatable. In the book, he said that this problem stems from the executive

level. 

Company owners or VPs are usually the reason sales managers have a tough time in juggling all their duties and this has nothing to do with the reports they are asking for. Rather, it has to do with the culture that is set within an organization. Executives, for example, aren’t focused on sales and so they don’t do everything in their power to cater to the sales effort. 

First line of defense

All the departments in a company or organization are important for the entire operation to work successfully. The marketing team, the development team, and all the other departments you can name are imperative for the organization to thrive. But all these other departments won’t be getting any money unless the sales team brings in more revenue. 

Sellers are the ones out there who are battling it out against the others. That is a huge amount of weight for the sales team because if it can’t happen, the company may fire the sales leaders for the lack of good results. 

Salespeople are foundations of a successful company and failing to recognize that is a problem.  We need a culture that is built around salespeople. 

Rate the tasks accordingly

Sales managers don’t necessarily have a defined role and instead, they have interconnecting roles within the organization.  For example, if you are helping the team generate revenue, then all your tasks must be related to that. But that’s not always the case. 

To define your goal, try to list the things that you do on a day-to-day basis and rate these activities from 1 to 5. (1 if the task isn’t helping you in fulfilling your goal, 5 if the activity is directly related to accomplishing your goals).  For instance, a one-to-one meeting with your sales rep to help the CS team increase its revenue is a full 5 rating. The meeting is an opportunity for you to give pipeline reviews with the sales rep to help him close more deals.  

Going on key account calls and weekly sales meetings are income-generating tasks and are closely tied to your goals. 

Housekeeping

On the other spectrum, you can have others complete tasks such as cleaning your inbox, creating spreadsheets to track sales and metrics, and attending meetings not related to your role. Or, if you prefer, do these tasks in your downtime. If you want to clean your inbox, then do it in your downtime. If you want a spreadsheet, then use CRM. And, if you want to attend the meetings unrelated to your task, you can jump in for a few minutes to check how it’s going instead of sitting down the whole two hours. 

Assess the tasks and if it’s possible to get an assistant to help you, then hire one. There are several platforms like Upwork where you can find somebody who can do something for you on a project basis.  Rating your tasks will make your work more efficient and will give you time for the more important things. 

Focus on the important ones

Ask yourself a series of questions before proceeding to every task. 

  • Am I needed at the meeting? 
  • Will it run effectively if I am not there? 
  • Will this task help my goal in increasing revenue? 
  • Rate the tasks and pick the ones that are most important by focusing on threes, fours, and fives. 

Fives are the obvious things that must happen. Set down the time for your meetings: time for the one-on-one, time for talking to your sellers, and all the other activities that are immediate. You might want to do the interviewing for new hires on a weekly basis or you might want to review resumes on a monthly basis. 

You must decide the schedules for the different activities and follow through. 

In this way, you can focus on the things that you need to and not be around for things that you don’t need to be a part of. You can also set a time to motivate your team and raise their morale by going to weekly or monthly lunch. 

Time is important 

Time is important and your sales reps need your time in closing deals and making sure that they’re overcoming challenges and working effectively. 

You are the coach and the sales reps are the players, and the only way for the team to work out is if both the coach and the players work hand-in-hand. If you are bogged down, hiding behind paperwork, and locked up in an office without a chance to connect with your reps, then you are never going to reach your goals. 

Applying this to The Sales Evangelist team helped me set the right culture as a leader of an organization. 

Money comes through the door when you are focused only on the things that you need to do.

“Managing Tasks as a Leader” episode resources 

Sales managers and leaders have different strategies in managing their tasks. If you have a story, don’t hesitate to drop me a message or tag me on LinkedIn, Donald C. Kelly. 

Check out Mike Weinberg’s book, Sales Management Simplified

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program which aims to help sales reps and sales team improve their skills in finding the right customers and knowing the strategies and activities that work. The program also teaches you the right questions to ask in order to build strong values and close huge deals. Go to thesalesevangelists.com/freecourse to get the first two episodes for free.

Audible is also a great avenue for sales learning. It has thousands of books that you can read

and audiobooks to listen that can help you to grow as a savvy salesperson. 

Give it a go to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. Just type in audibletrial.com/tse. If you enjoyed this episode and learned from it, please do give us a review 5-star rating on Apple podcast. You can also share this podcast with your friends and colleagues who are using other platforms such as Google Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify

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Planning, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1132: My New Planning Tool

Planning, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

Sellers must work to effectively plan their activities in order to accomplish the important tasks in their days, and since I’ve struggled with the same challenges, I’ve developed a new planning tool to help with that effort. 

For most of us, it isn’t unreasonable to find that we have more tasks due in a day than we can possibly accomplish, and we can end up feeling like we’ve failed when we come up short. Unless we change how we do things, our days will feel like Groundhog Day, and we’ll repeat the same ineffective patterns every day. 

Falling short

If we fail to complete our to-do list every single day, we’ll end the day feeling like we’ve failed. Worse yet, our list will grow every day because it will include tasks from the previous day that we didn’t finish. Eventually, we’ll feel emotionally drained by our ineffectiveness. 

Now, while you’re trying to find new leads, get new deals, and close new opportunities, you’ll likely be preoccupied with your looming to-do list. 

You’ll never completely escape the stressful moments and days in sales, but if you learn to effectively manage the time you have, you’ll better manage that stress. Whether you’re selling cars or selling services, you’re at risk of being frustrated by the to-do list. 

Identifying the process

I discovered in my own process of organizing tasks I was spending as much time planning the tasks as I did accomplishing them. The result was that I was going in circles. I had read a book by Kevin Cruz called 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management that prompted me to take control of my schedule. (I recommend you read it, too. It’s available on Audible.)

I started by writing down all the tasks I needed to do each day, keeping in mind that I function best when I keep my days broken up. Kevin recommended breaking your day into 15-minute increments, which was a great idea, but honestly 30-minute increments worked best for me. I planned my entire day, including tasks like reading a sales book, listening to a podcast, prospecting, LinkedIn outreach, follow-up with clients, or proposal preparation. 

Creating a planner

I decided to create my own planner that specifically addresses my unique tasks. One side of the planner allows me to list all the different tasks I do and divide them into different categories. In my case, as a business owner, I have certain categories that other sellers may not have. 

The top of each page has my KPIs which will help me generate sales and move the needle. They include new prospects, new opportunities, deals, progress. I list my top three goals or priorities for the day and things that I know I must get done. Some of them will be sales-related and some will be beyond sales. 

For example, Mondays are podcast interview days. Other tasks on other days might include working with a team member to accomplish an internal task or meeting with a bookkeeper. Some days I’m writing a guest blog post for Hubspot or some other publication or creating content for social media. I also include personal tasks like appointments. 

At the bottom of the page, because I’m also a consultant, I track my clients and the consultations I have with them. 

Devoting time

On the second side of the page, I allocate time for each of the different tasks, in either 15- or 30-minute increments. I order the tasks according to importance because I have them divided by category. 

Over time, I can track the categories and tasks that are taking a lot of my time. In some cases, I can push some of those tasks to other team members to free time in my own schedule. 

As an example, I realized I was spending a lot of time handling emails and I wasn’t able to efficiently get back to people when I needed to. I trained my executive assistant to help manage my email account and invested a couple of days into helping her establish a process. Now she helps me distinguish between junk emails and those that require an answer. As a result, my admin tasks have diminished a bit. 

If you’re thinking you don’t have the luxury of an executive assistant, it’s possible to find trustworthy people on platforms like Upwork.

Maximizing time

Some tasks can be shared by other team members through the use of templates. If I need a presentation created, I can use a template from PandaDoc to have someone else create it for me. This frees up my time to focus on things that matter the most. 

At the end of the day, I can note my actual accomplishments for the day and how much I was able to achieve. Based on those numbers, I can judge how efficient I was. Did I get to 70 percent? Strive to get A’s, but know that B’s are ok. C’s are no good. 

I’m going to create a video to share on LinkedIn that will show you how you can build a planner of your own, and ultimately we’ll create a new planning tool for sellers, though our current one targets entrepreneurs.

“New Planning Tool” episode resources

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. 

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

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Steven Griffith, Time Management, Donald Kelly

TSE 1069: Sales From The Street – “Your Time Management Ideas Are Wrong”

Steven Griffith, Time Management, Donald KellyMany sellers elongate the sales process without even realizing it, and Steven Griffith is here to talk about how to take control of your time and to explain that your time management ideas are wrong.

Steven is a performance coach and the author of the book, The Time Cleanse: A Proven System to Eliminate Wasted Time, Realize Your Full Potential, and Reinvest In What Matters Most. He explains how to close the performance gap and get hours back in your day.

Performance research

Steven discovered about five years ago that all of his performance clients were pointing to the same roadblock to their success: they didn’t have enough time. He even discovered that he was feeling the same way.

Technology has created more distractions and it prompts us to multi-task all the time. Our lives are moving at an incredible pace and we’re all over-stimulated by toxins that steal and hijack our time.

Old time management strategies worked when the phone was connected to the wall by a cord. We live by the notion that time is scarce so we’re working to cram as much into each hour as we can.

“If time allows”

Most people have an adverse relationship to time, so Steven teaches his clients to establish a positive relationship with time so that time becomes abundant. It’s a matter of viewing time as an ally rather than a foe, and working with it instead of fighting against it.

Consider the phrase “if time allows.” Steven routinely asks people whose time they are referring to when they use this phrase.

We’ve conditioned ourselves to believe that time has the power to allow us to accomplish things. We buy into the idea that time is an outside thing that we’re working against when, in fact, we are time.

Compressing the sales cycle

Steven talks about compressing a sales cycle to fit one year’s worth of sales into one month.

He tells the story of a real estate professional who sells luxury real estate in L.A. He had health issues in the third quarter and he was really underwater.

They worked together to do a time cleanse that would help him compress his time.

Steven said we all have a built-in belief system about how long a sale takes. We’re conditioned by our industries to believe in ideas like slow seasons and high seasons.

Our mental framework keeps us in that mindset, so we get stuck. We might go up or down by 10 percent but we’ll always come back to our conditioned thermostat.

Steven asked the agent if it was possible to complete a year’s worth of sales in 10 months’ time. Without worrying about how to do it, he simply wanted to know if it could be done.

Could it be done in 8 months? Or 6?

Steven worked to break apart his self-limiting beliefs about how long the sales cycle takes. By the time they got down to 8 weeks, he admitted that he didn’t know how he would do it.

They started building a new framework in which it was possible to do a year’s worth of sales production in 8 weeks.

Mandatory activities

They started by identifying the activities that the agent absolutely had to do. Steven calls these ROT activities or high return-on-time activities.

His biggest business-generating sales activities were his 10×10, (10 contacts by 10 a.m.) and researching the market for pre-qualified buyers.

His time cleanse involved identifying different categories like technology, people, places, and others and categorizing their time. Once they had written everything down, they considered whether each activity was contributing to or contaminating his time.

By the end of the activity, they reclaimed 25 hours a week, 8 of which was the coffee shop. They identified his time there as a contaminant because his visits often turned into two-hour stays. Instead, they sent his assistant to get his coffee each day.

The time cleanse gives you the opportunity to evaluate whether you’re doing the right things at the right times.

He redistributed his time and assigned his non-revenue-generating activities to his assistant as well.

Timefulness

Next, Steven showed his client how to set his day up to perform. He calls the concept timefulness, which is an advancement of mindfulness.

It’s being present in the moment so that we stop multitasking. We maintain a single focus which can 2 or 3x our results on its own.

The client put everything on his calendar, and he created a reset strategy. He set an alarm on his phone to go off every hour, and when it did, he would check to make sure that he was being mindful. If he wasn’t following the plan at that point, the alarm was his cue to return to it.

Sales increased

After about two or three weeks, he couldn’t believe how quickly the sales started coming. Like many people, he said, “I can’t believe this is happening so fast.” Steven cautions people to avoid that mindset because that doubt will keep things from happening quickly.

The client got laser-focused on his activities that generated revenue and he developed a relationship with time that supported those activities. He didn’t feel like he was fighting the clock anymore.

Be aware as a seller that if you’re stressed out, people will sense it and they likely won’t want to be around you.

At the end of 8 weeks, the client had done the most he had ever done in a quarter, and he went on to hit his all-time career record that year.

Believe

We must overcome what Steven calls our “always way of being,” which is our belief that certain activities take a certain amount of time. We’ve been conditioned to believe that work must be hard and that we must grind to achieve the things we want.

Although it’s true that you must have time in order to conduct sales, it’s possible for sales to happen instantly. Begin by asking yourself how you can compress time. If you don’t ask the question, you’ll never get the answer.

Don’t use the phrase time management. We don’t manage our family members, but rather we want to be connected to them and work in unison with them. The same is true of time.

How to start

If you find yourself wanting to try Steven’s concepts, begin by shattering the neurological connections in your mind that say this isn’t possible. Then, do your own cleanse. Determine what is contaminating your time. Anything that is holding you back from accelerating your goals and dreams is a contaminant.

Write down every single interaction and ask yourself whether your activities are contributing.

It could be Facebook, negative people, or any other thing that takes up your time.

Most people get back a minimum of 10 hours, but most get back 20 or more.

Many people resist the idea of compressing time because they use time as an excuse for not doing, being, and having. They frame themselves as victims of time. #CompressTime

If we say things like “Time doesn’t allow,” it lets us off the hook because we aren’t in charge. Instead, go on a time-excuse diet where you stop using time as a justification for not accomplishing things.

High-performance hours

As an entrepreneur and sales professional, the word no is as powerful as the word yes. Realize what you’re saying yes to, what you’re saying no to, and where your high-performance hours are.

Steven dedicates an entire section of the book to setting up their day to perform. In fact, many people are doing the right activities at the wrong time. We must determine when we have our best energy and then cluster those similar activities together. Our brains work more efficiently and we’ll get better results.

If you are time, and you’re 100 percent accountable and responsible for it without letting anything steal it, you take 100 percent control of your life and the results you get.

“Your Time Management Ideas Are Wrong” episode resources

If you’d like to connect with Steven, go to stevengriffith.com/salesevangelist for a free download of his top 10 performance tips to help you perform better with time. You can also pre-order a copy of his book, The Time Cleanse: A Proven System to Eliminate Wasted Time, Realize Your Full Potential, and Reinvest In What Matters Most. When you do, you’ll get free access to his master class that walks you step-by-step through the cleanse process.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Scott Beebe, Processes, Business Growth, Business Development

TSE 1038: Leveraging Systems and Processes to Grow Your Business

Scott Beebe, Processes, Business Growth, Business DevelopmentAs a small business owner, it’s tempting to spend too much time on the details instead of leveraging systems and processes to grow your business. 

Scott Beebe serves small business owners and works to free them from the chaos of constantly working on the details of owning a business. He teaches them how to avoid having to put out fires and moves them toward the freedom of working on their business.

As sellers and entrepreneurs, many of us don’t have the kind of systems in place that will help us succeed.

Developing systems and processes

Zig Ziglar pointed out that we are all sellers. Even if you can’t immediately see how processes will help you in your own role, it’s likely that you’ll benefit from them.

Some sellers are in the Wild West style selling situation while others are in a more starched, blue-collar kind of setting. Those sellers with very well-defined roles may have a hard time expanding outside that role into less well-defined roles.

Vehicles are a great example of a series of systems. Within each system under the hood of your car, there are additional systems and processes: the cooling system, the combustion system, and thousands of others. Whether you’re in the gun-slinging or the starched side of sales, you still need systems.

In sales, your systems drive what you do.

Begin by thinking about the systems and processes that you’re haphazardly bandaging together, and how you might achieve more success if you could put a defined process in place.

Many sellers fail because they don’t know what to do next.

Ignoring processes

Whether you’re an owner, a seller, or a manager, the number one barrier to processes and systems is the pain of sitting down and doing it. Most people who invest the time to do it hate doing it.

What makes you great is taking the time to develop your back-end systems and processes so you can go out and do what you do best.

Delegating tasks

Rory Vaden, author of the book Take the Stairs: 7 Steps to Achieving True Success, outlines a concept he calls the 30x principle. If you identify a 5-minute task and 30x that task, that’s about the amount of time it will take you to train someone else to do that task.

We look at that and think, “I’m not going to invest two-and-a-half hours to teach someone to do a 5-minute task.” Now imagine that 5-minute task over the course of 250 working days, and then ask yourself if it’s worth the two-plus hours of your time to get back more than 20 hours time.

It’s the equivalent of about 70% return on your time investment.

Creating processes

Begin by articulating where you’re going. On Scott’s Business On Purpose podcast he refers to it as the “vision story.”

If we plan a trip, and I give you a destination, you might be inclined to go along. But if I give you specific details about where we’re headed and what we’ll see while we’re there, and what kinds of experiences we will have when we arrive, you’ll likely be much more excited about the trip, and more likely to want to go along.

Many salespeople just want to make more money without any ceilings, but everything comes with a cost.

  • What will it cost for you to get to the point you’re trying to reach?
  • What do I want this business to look like when I’m done with it?

We can build the fanciest systems and processes, but if you don’t have any idea where you’re going, you’ll end up in the middle of nowhere.

When you lay out your vision, you’ll give people the opportunity to decide whether they’ll get on board.

Mapping your processes

Use this template to create processes for your business:

  1. Articulate your vision story to determine where you’d like to go.
  2. Articulate your mission statement, which is just your vision story in miniature. It’s the distilled version of your vision story. Make it less than 15 words. It’s your motto.
  3. Create your unique core values which are unique to you. (These are not values like honesty which serve everyone well in business.) These are the key words from your mission statement which uniquely describe you.
  4. Identify the systems that you have. If you’re a small business owner, sales will likely be one of your systems.
  5. Take advantage of outsourcing. Train, train, train. Realize that if you don’t take time to train, you’ll likely fail in your efforts.

Find a place where you can document the process. Write out the individual steps in the process.

Once you’ve done that, you can review it with your employee. Then, you can use Screencast-O-Matic or ScreenFlow to record the process. Once you’ve presented it, you never have to do it again.

“Leveraging Systems and Processes to Grow Your Business” episode resources

Connect with Scott on www.fourstepstobusinessfreedom.com. Check out Screencast-O-Matic or ScreenFlow to learn how to capture processes for later use.

You can also listen to our conversation with Rory Vaden on TSE episode 109.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If you put in a lot of hard work in 2018 but weren’t able to close many of your deals, we can help you fix that. We have a new semester beginning in April and it would be an honor to have you join. Visit thesalesevangelist.com/CST.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Steve Richard, Execvision.io, Sales Manager, Sales Coaching, 5 common mistakes

TSE 1003: 5 Common Mistakes Sales Managers Make When Coaching

Steve Richard, Execvision.io, Sales Manager, Sales Coaching, 5 common mistakes

In our work with sales reps, sales teams, and sales managers, we encounter many people who believe that sales coaching doesn’t work, but many of them fail to realize that there are 5 common mistakes sales managers make when coaching.

Steve Richard, founder of ExecVision, shares how to avoid those mistakes, and he suggests you start by recognizing that there’s a difference between coaching and training.

Coaching

Training is teaching someone to do something new that the person doesn’t know how to do. Coaching is helping someone do something that they do know to the point of mastery.

If we expect a rep to embrace a certain behavior, we have to train him. If we don’t, that failure is on us. Then, after we’ve trained him, we have to overcome the “forgetting curve” which is a function of our brain’s tendency to purge information.

Coaching is the act of training iteratively, focusing on the person, and repeating that behavior until it becomes second nature, like tying a shoe.

Consider whether your organization is struggling with any of these mistakes.

1. Failing to define what good looks like.

We must give our teams a definition of what a call should look like. Include the key things you want them to say, the behaviors you want them to exhibit, and give them a target.

Give your team members total clarity on what you want them to do. [06:11] Develop consistency among your team members so you can hit bigger numbers.

Also, build a team of people who will identify these steps. Include managers, senior executives, and representatives from operations, enablement, and sales. A varied team can ensure that these decisions aren’t being made by people who haven’t made calls in a while.

Check out the book Cracking the Sales Management Code: The Secrets to Measuring and Managing Sales Performance for clarification about metrics. Learn the difference between activity metrics that you can control — things like making phone calls and sending LinkedIn connection requests — and objectives like having conversations with people which you have less control over.

Aside from simply giving your team members goals, give them a roadmap to achieve them. [08:32] How many activities should they achieve in a week to achieve their goals?

Many organizations have salespeople who are “unconsciously competent,” which means they don’t know why they are successful. Though it’s not bad, it’s impossible to scale. You can’t pair a new employee with someone who is “unconsciously competent” and expect her to learn the right way to do things.

2. Neglecting to train because of time.

Most every sales leader intends to coach his team. [10:26]

Managers typically know they have to be more consistent as a team, and they know that the way to do that is through coaching. But they also universally say that time is the thing that prohibits them from doing it.

They have the greatest of intentions, but something always gets in the way.

3. Misunderstanding how to train correctly.

It’s shocking to think of the amount of money that is spent on sales rep training. Sales managers, however, typically receive very little training. Many of them have never been taught to coach the right way.

Think, for example, of a sales manager who observes a call and then immediately launches into constructive feedback. Basically, he tells you all the things you did wrong.

When the sales rep hears it, his system sends a hit of the stress hormone cortisol, which triggers the “fight or flight” response.

The sales rep either defends himself by digging in his heels or he puts up a wall and stops listening. In either case, it’s not good.

Instead, try the model that Jim Kennan recommends: observe, describe, prescribe. Leave the judgment on the shelf.

Listen to the call. Recount what the rep did during the call. Then ask a question that prompts the seller to figure out what he could have done differently to improve the call.

People value more what they can conclude for themselves than what they’re told. 

4. Lacking observable moments.

If sales reps can’t listen to recordings of their calls, they’ll have no way to improve their performance. [18:45] They will only have vague ideas of what they think they did during the call.

During the 80s, the Japanese beat us in the auto industry because they were continually improving their operational efficiency.

Adopt the continuous improvement mindset that served the Japanese so well.

5. Making training ad hoc.

Your organization’s training must be habitual. It must be part of the rhythm of the company.

Make your training such a part of the process that it becomes the gospel.

It can be as simple as listening to 5 minutes of a call with a rep and asking for reflections. It will do good things for your company.

Instead of feeling like sales managers have to do all the work, involve the sales reps in their own development. Run call-of-the-month competitions where reps submit their best call every month with written commentary.

Give people an environment in which it’s fun to learn and improve.

“5 Common Mistakes Sales Managers Make When Coaching” episode resources

Connect with Steve via email or call him on his cell phone at (202) 302-3193.

Check out ExecVision’s Call Camp that breaks down real sales calls like game tape to evaluate what works and what doesn’t. It’s a free webinar that shares practical advice with sales reps, managers, and leaders to improve their effectiveness.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

They are offering a 14-day free trial, and half off your subscription when you use the code Donald at checkout.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Planning, Distractions, Sales Podcast

TSE 977: Stop Unnecessary Distractions

 

Donald Kelly, Planning, Distractions, Sales PodcastMany of the activities in our day don’t actually help us close more deals. We’re busy doing things, but they aren’t moving our deals forward.

Today we’ll talk about the things that distract us as sales reps, and how we can stop unnecessary distractions that are actually hindering our efforts.

Distractions

Email is a necessary part of our sales efforts but spending time cleaning up our email isn’t an effective use of our time.

If this were a football game, you wouldn’t be in the locker room trying to learn plays. Once the game starts, you’ll spend your time trying to advance the ball and score.

So why do we spend our time at work doing things that aren’t conducive to closing deals? [4:30]

Very often, we are hesitant to do the things that we really need to do. We don’t want to make cold calls or try to upsell our existing customers.

Record your activity

Spend an entire week writing down all your activity and the amount of time you spend on it. [5:14]

If you go to the kitchen to get a drink, write it down. If you talk with other team members, write that down and record how long it takes.

Record all of your activities: email, updating CRM, creating proposals and attending meetings. Write down how long you spend on planning and social media.

If you get sidetracked by your cell phone, write it down, and write the time next to it.

As you do this over the course of a week, you’ll begin to see trends in your daily activity.

Analyze your activity

Now look at your activity and figure out which steps actually contribute to your closing deals. [6:46]

Be honest about your activity and look for places that you can use your time better. Could you take a shorter lunch break a couple of days a week to create more time for sales activity?

Score every activity on a scale of 1 to 3: 1’s are things that don’t help you close deals, while 3’s are things that contribute greatly to your closings. You can even use a 1 to 5 scale if that works better for you.

Find the activities that aren’t helping you close deals and pay attention to the amount of time you spend on those activities.

Redirect your time

Once you’ve identified the things that aren’t helping your efforts, figure out how that time spent cleaning out your email can be better used.

Over time, these small amounts of time add up to hours that we could be using to focus on something productive. [9:13] Instead of checking ESPN, I could reach out to a prospect on LinkedIn.

Eliminate tasks that you don’t need to do. Ask for accountability from your manager or your coworkers. Use apps that prevent you from accessing distracting websites.

Intentionally focus on those activities that scored higher on your list. Outsource those activities that bog you down.

Uncomplicate things

Eliminate things that keep you from being the very best seller you can be. [11:41]

  1. Audit your time to see how you’re spending it.
  2. Rate your activities and eliminate unnecessary tasks.
  3. Hyperfocus on the important activities.

This will change your business and your personal life when you implement it.

“Unnecessary Distractions” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Carissa Hill, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Time Management

TSE 949: Sales From The Street – “You Do Have Time”

Carissa Hill, Sales From The Street, The Sales Evangelist, You Do Have Time

Everyone has the same amount of available time every day. When people lack the time to systemize their businesses or hire and train new people, it’s because they aren’t using their time in the right way. They aren’t prioritizing the things that are important.

On today’s episode, serial entrepreneur Carissa Hill shares how to grow your business and then systemize it, and prove to yourself that you do have time.

Carissa wrote a book called You Do Have Time because she wanted to help people understand that when they use their time the right way, they’ll have plenty of time to accomplish the important things that need to be done.

Changing focus

Carissa’s journey began when she was trying to run three stores by herself and she realized she was taking on too many things.

She focused on all the wrong things instead of focusing on the things that would truly grow her business.

Carissa was operating a chain of hair and beauty salons and she found herself micromanaging her team. It kept her from getting the results she wanted, just as it does to other people.

Business owners might, for example, invest time in getting more social media followers instead of working to truly learn marketing, and sales, and conversion.

Right things

If you want your business to continually grow, you must focus on lead generation and sales. As soon as you take your foot off the pedal for marketing and selling, it will slow down.

As you grow, you can scale that by hiring salespeople or automating things. You can offer launches to groups of people rather than selling one-to-one.

Many sellers and business owners allow fear to dictate their actions. Fear of rejection, fear of the next level of success, and fear of the unknown prevent people from taking the next steps.

Many people run Facebook ads that generate a lot of success, and then, instead of hiring someone to help them continue to grow, they’ll turn the ad off because they are too busy.

When they get out of their comfort zone, they’ll return to the place where they are comfortable rather than pushing out of it.

People fear uncharted territory and additional work and the second- and third-order effects that come with success.

Overcoming fear

Carissa said the key is to help clients find clarity about the things they are truly afraid of.

What is the worst thing that will happen if you take this step?

When Carissa started making YouTube videos, she was terrified of negative comments. That fear kept her from generating videos for a long time until she intentionally addressed what she would actually do if she got negative comments.

Once she had a plan for the worst-case scenario, she was able to move beyond the fear and try making some videos.

Don’t allow the fear to linger in your brain.

The other step is to decide whether you’re prepared to stay in the place you’re currently in. If you aren’t willing to stay here, then what will you do to get yourself out of this place?

The truth is that you could be helping many more people if you got beyond the fear that is holding you back.

Eliminate clutter

Answer this question first: Are you crystal clear about where all of your time is going?

Many people don’t know the answer to that question, so the best place to start is with a time-audit system. Keeping a time audit means that you write down everything you do and how long each task takes you, for a total of seven days.

Once you’ve done that, you can pretty quickly identify the wasted time in your day. The simple act of writing down your tasks will kick yourself into gear because you’ll create accountability for yourself.

You’ll discover the time you’re spending on social media, even if it’s just in 5-minute increments. You’ll identify all the things you’re doing in a week, and you’ll likely find tasks that aren’t creating any return on investment and that aren’t enjoyable for you.

The first thing Carissa did was outsource her housecleaning because it took hours of her time and she didn’t enjoy it. She recovered the hours she once spent cleaning her house so she could focus on other things.

Once you’ve completed a time audit, put a smiley face or sad face next to each item as a step toward figuring out the tasks you want to keep and the ones you could let go of. Find things to outsource or automate.

Make a “Things Not To Do” list to identify the things you don’t want to do. Focus on those things that will move the needle.

Streamline

Carissa discovered early in her coaching career that she was spending a lot of time on sales calls because she thought that was the only way to sell. She got tired of it because she couldn’t scale herself.

She tried an online launch style because she determined that her ideal prospects had all the same concerns and objections. By getting numerous people on one call, she was able to streamline her process and save herself a lot of time.

She found herself having the same conversation over and over, so she addressed those questions and issues in a PDF. She offers it as an info pack to her prospects, who can contact her if they need more information after they’ve reviewed it.

Facebook ads

You’ve got to have a really good offer and if people want it, they will buy it. Offer something that sells someone’s problem.

Offer content that is so good that you should really be charging people for it. Don’t hold too much back from your prospects.

If you can get people results in advance without costing them anything, you’ll create the sense that the paid info must be really good if the free stuff is already producing results.

Time

You can’t get time back. The way you spend your minutes, your hours, and your days is your entire life. You can always make more money but you can’t make more time.

Get really clear about what you want out of your life. Determine what is most important to you.

Instead of reaching the end of your life wishing you hadn’t spent so much time scrolling on your phone, do things that actually help people. Spend time on things that you enjoy.

Ask yourself this: Is this the highest and best use of your time?

Post that question somewhere that you’ll see it frequently and you’ll improve the way you spend your time.

Focus on delivering what people really want. Focus your energy on that so you can help people well.

“You Do Have Time” episode resources

Connect with Carissa on her website or her Facebook group.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers and provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Jason Avery, Donald Kelly, Contractor Success

604: Sales From The Street-“Time Is Money”

AJason Avery, Donald Kelly, Contractor Successre you making sure you’re casting your net to your target? Otherwise, you may just be wasting your time doing all things that you could have delegated to others. Today’s guest is Jason Avery. He has been part of the contracting world and he has helped many contractors to become effective in their business amidst the bad rap contractors have.

Jason is sharing some of his great insights into how you can understand contractors better regardless of which industry you’re in, specifically focusing on how critical balancing your time is.

Jason is the owner of Avery Construction, a general contracting company doing kitchen remodels, bathroom remodels, and room additions around the Tampa Bay area. He also started a company called Constructing Success where he does coaching and consulting helping other general contractors and tradespeople how to project cash flow and budget jobs accordingly to make sure they’re making their margins. He is the author of the book Constructing Success, a #1 bestseller.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Jason:

Struggles Jason faced as an entrepreneur:

Balancing time when you’re wearing multiple hats that you find yourself working all the time but not really being 100% effective due to exhaustion

Strategies for time management:

Focus on the specific jobs you want.

Narrow your target market. Focus on where you need to aim.

Then spend time and energy narrowing the odds.

Invest in your marketing. You have to have leads.

Hire other people to do things for you so you can reduce your tasks on the more specific and the more important ones.

Figure out whether to focus on leads or referrals.

About the Room Full of Referrals Program

This comes out once per quarter. Check out www.construct-success.com and visit their events page.

About Jonathan’s book: Constructing Success

Learn about concepts such as the customer experience roller coaster and how to maintain the relationship over time with clients who still like you and want to refer you.

Jason’s Major Takeaways:

Believe it. Believe that you can put the team together. Believe that you can make it happen. Believe that you find the time and that you’re really not that busy. Think of all the things you tie yourself up in and how much time you spend buried in the email graveyard trying to sort out stuff you just moved from one file to the next. Hire other people to do things for you. And use that time to find ways to be productive. Put yourself into building tomorrow.

When you are considering constructing another business strategy, make sure you’re not distracting yourself from the core business. Anything new you do is a complement to what you’re already doing. It may just include a new brand.

Episode Resources:

Get connected with Jonathan on www.averyconstruction.com

www.construct-success.com

Constructing Success by Jason Avery

Join the TSE Hustler’s League. This semester we’re focusing on how you can become more buyer-centric and how you can increase your win rate of opportunities.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Daily Planning, Calendar, Donald Kelly, Sales Coaching

TSE 345: TSE Hustler’s League-“This Calendar Thing Worked”

Daily Planning, Calendar, Donald Kelly, Sales Coaching

Are you really selling as a sales rep? How much of your time do you really spend on actual selling? A study done showed that sales professionals spend an average of only about 39% of their time on actual selling.

Today, I’m going to share snippets from two of our sessions over at TSE Hustler’s League where I talked about how to focus your time on selling as well as how Martin Clay, one of our members, has implemented it. You don’t want to miss this episode!

Here are the highlights of today’s episode:

Different areas of a seller’s job:

  • Prospecting
  • Actual selling
  • Customer service
  • Administrative work/planning
  • Meetings

How to focus your time more effectively on selling:

  1. Write down activities that you can put under the areas mentioned above.
  • What are you doing on a daily basis to prospect? (Making phone calls/emails, sending out messages on social media, etc.)
  • What are things you’re doing when you’re selling? (Phone/face-to-face meetings, demonstrations, etc.)
  • What admin tasks do you have to do? (Proposals, quotes, paperwork, confidentiality agreements, etc.)
  • What meetings do you have on a weekly basis?

Listing all this allows you to be more mindful of your schedule as a seller and realize how much time you’re spending on a specific thing like emailing and whether you’re falling into a trap with them.

  1. Literally schedule out your day and break them into sections.

Do this so it doesn’t suck away from your time and gain more people into your pipeline. I let them give a quick peek into my own calendar to show them how I have broken down my time for each of the tasks I need to do and set them into specific blocks.

Once you do this, you get to hyperfocus your time and spend the next certain allotted minutes for that certain task.

  1. Take ownership and make sure you’re doing selling-related activities.

Don’t be distracted. If you’re not tracking it then you will not know what you’re doing and won’t realize how only little of your time is spent on selling. Take the time to sit down and look at your schedule and what you’re doing. Focus on putting those things at the right place and at the right time.

Results one of our members saw from practicing this a week later…

  • Organization – Becoming more organized – from chaotic to scheduled
  • Mindfulness – Becoming more mindful – not forgetting anything. Having a calendar serves as your task reminder especially when doing follow ups
  • Focus – Becoming more focused and not burnt out

Episode Resources:

Kevin Kruse’s book 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

 

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Time Management, Sales Leaders, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 330: TSE Hustler’s League-“Salesperson Time Management”

Time Management, Sales Leaders, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastIn today’s episode, I’m giving you a snippet out of one of our training in TSE Hustler’s League where we discuss the idea about focusing and making sure we’re maximizing our efforts while selling. Too many times, salespeople get distracted from the real things they need to focus more on.

In this snippet, one of our members shared with us a particular challenge regarding their time while I also share my two cents worth.

Here are the highlights of today’s episode:

Challenges:

  • Juggling everything with so many different hats to wear
  • Having good time management skills
  • Being honest and jumping into the fear of not having enough leads

Strategies:

  1. Think about the “big rocks” that you have in your life and write them down.
  2. Write down all the things you must do to make a sale (ex. writing proposals, making cold calls, connecting with prospects, customer service, sending emails, etc.)
  3. Create your own analytics as far as what you can do to be successful. Use a spreadsheet, for example, citing the following:
  • Messages
  • No messages
  • Follow ups
  • Appointments set
  • Opportunities generated
  1. Break down your day into the different activities you need to do.

Some of the members in the league have been closing deals because of implementing these simple little strategies. If you’d like to join the community, just go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/hustlers and get the opportunity to join our group training community and come with us every week to gain deep insights, have some accountability, and build really awesome relationships.

Episode Resources:

15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management by Kevin Kruse

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Kevin Kruse, Time Management, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, THe Best Sales Podcast

TSE 266: 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management

Kevin Kruse, Time Management, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, THe Best Sales Podcast Having time management and productivity issues? Well, our guest today, Kevin Kruse has this to say, “We can’t manage time but we can manage our attention, our energy, and our focus.”

Kevin Kruse is a serial entrepreneur turned writer and speaker who is passionate about productivity and leadership. In this episode, Kevin discusses some important aspects in his recent book, 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management. Kevin interviewed four groups of people, specifically billionaires, Olympians, students, and entrepreneurs, and he found some commonalities of productivity habits among them.

The things and insights you can glean from this episode might actually surprise you! So listen in to help you get started and become more productive.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Kevin:

What he learned from Mark Cuban: The evil of meetings

Not an efficient way of communication

Meetings are worse than phone calls. Phone calls are worse than emails. Emails are worse than text messages.

Meetings are killers in terms of productivity

Stop doing a to-do list! Work from your calendar.

  • A 2014 study showed that 41% of to-do list items are never completed and 50% of the items on our to-do list we put it on the very same day
  • Understand what you value and time-block that.
  • Time-block in 15-minute chunks. Map out your calendar ahead of time.

Handling emails:

Kevin’s 3-21 email technique:

  • 3 times – Doing the email process three times a day.
  • 21 minutes – which means 20-25 minutes of email time
  • Set a goal of zero inbox as much as you can.

Follow the 4D’s:

  • Delete
  • Delegate
  • Do it quickly (in less than 5 minutes)
  • Defer (schedule time by turning the email into a calendar event)

Treat emails like any other task and not as a means to procrastinate.

Time is the most valuable asset.

  • Be willing to say no to certain things.
  • Work smart, not hard.

How to remember and apply these productivity habits: [E-3C’s]

  1. Energy

Maximize your energy. We can’t manage time but we can manage our attention, our energy, and our focus. Start with the fundamentals. Rest, eat healthy, and exercise.

  1. Capture

Capture everything into a notebook. Don’t try to remember things. Write it all down.

  1. Calendar

Work from your calendar. Don’t put tasks on your to-do list. Put it on your calendar to help you become more realistic about getting things done. Say no to things you don’t have the time for.

  1. Concentrate

Concentrate during your working jam sessions.

One more thing…

Drop – Delegate – Re-design

Kevin mentions a Harvard experiment wherein four activity trainers went to companies talking employees into looking at their calendar per week and asking themselves three questions:

  1. Drop – What would happen if you just dropped it?
  2. Delegate – Who else can maybe do it?
  3. Redesign – If you can’t delegate it, redesign and ask:
  • How can the same outcome be achieved in less time?
  • What would you do with it if you only had half the time?

Just by doing this, people are able to save an average of 6 hours of desk work and 2 hours of meeting time every week. Take the time to pause and be thoughtful before diving into your routine.

Connect with Kevin by sending him an email at kevin@kevinkruse.com

Episode Resources:

Check out Kevin’s book, 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management
Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join Us Today!

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly